Why the Selection of Hong Kong’s New Leader Is a Blow to Democracy Activists

Carrie Lam poses after being named Hong Kong’s new chief executive, Hong Kong, March 26, 2017 (Imaginechina via AP Images).
Carrie Lam poses after being named Hong Kong’s new chief executive, Hong Kong, March 26, 2017 (Imaginechina via AP Images).

On Sunday, Carrie Lam, the candidate preferred by Beijing, was chosen as Hong Kong’s next chief executive, a development that was widely seen as a setback for those worried about the preservation of Hong Kong’s autonomy. The following day, nine pro-democracy activists involved in protests in 2014 turned themselves into police, who announced they would be charged with causing a “public nuisance.” In an email interview, Michael C. Davis, a senior fellow at the University of Hong Kong’s Center for Comparative and Public Law, discusses what Lam’s election means for Hong Kong’s relationship with Beijing as well as possible next […]

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