Turkey’s Frayed Ties With the West Are Unlikely to Improve Under Biden

Turkey’s Frayed Ties With the West Are Unlikely to Improve Under Biden
Then-Vice President Joe Biden meets with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara, Aug. 25, 2016 (pool photo by Kayhan Ozer for Presidential Press Service, via AP).

As President-elect Joe Biden prepares to take office later this month, many U.S. allies and partners are eyeing an opportunity for better relations with Washington. But Turkey, under the leadership of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, will face an uphill battle to settle its ongoing disputes with the United States, not to mention its other NATO allies. There are three major impediments to a reset in Turkey’s ties with the West. First, the U.S. remains at loggerheads with Turkey over Erdogan’s decision to purchase an advanced missile defense system from Russia. Second, the European Union is considering tough sanctions against Ankara […]

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