Why Evo Morales Fell—and What Comes Next for Bolivia

A Bolivian army helicopter flies over the road leading to the state-owned Senkata gasoline plant, El Alto, Bolivia, Nov. 19, 2019 (AP photo by Natacha Pisarenko).
A Bolivian army helicopter flies over the road leading to the state-owned Senkata gasoline plant, El Alto, Bolivia, Nov. 19, 2019 (AP photo by Natacha Pisarenko).
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It’s been a little over a week since Evo Morales resigned as president of Bolivia in the aftermath of his disputed victory in the country’s first-round presidential election on Oct. 20. Following mass demonstrations against a vote that many saw as illegitimate and marred by fraud, Morales stepped down at the “suggestion” of the country’s military and fled to Mexico. An interim government is in place, but unrest has only worsened in recent days. Protests continue in the highlands of the country, where support for Morales and his Movement for Socialism party are strong, and last week security forces reportedly […]

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