Why Ethiopia Is Keeping Its State of Emergency in Place

Why Ethiopia Is Keeping Its State of Emergency in Place
Ethiopian soldiers face protesters, Bishoftu, Ethiopia, Oct. 2, 2016 (AP photo).

In late March, lawmakers in Ethiopia voted unanimously to extend the country’s state of emergency for four more months. The emergency was first imposed last October as violence escalated following more than a year of anti-government protests. The protests have largely occurred in the Oromia and Amhara regions, the homelands of the country’s two biggest ethnic groups who complain of being marginalized by the central government. In an email interview, William Davison, an Addis Ababa-based freelance journalist and WPR contributor, gives an update on the crisis and the government’s response. WPR: How has the crisis in Ethiopia evolved since last […]

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