Why Congo’s Election Tug-of-War Just Got Even More Complicated

Why Congo’s Election Tug-of-War Just Got Even More Complicated
A security guard stands behind the coffin of Congolese opposition icon Etienne Tshisekedi during a service, Brussels, Feb. 5, 2017 (AP photo by Geert Vanden Wijngaert).

KINSHASA, Congo — Since the Democratic Republic of Congo secured its independence in 1960, its people have become accustomed to living under unstable or dictatorial governments, but they entered 2017 especially unsure of where their country stands. At the heart of their uncertainty is the continuing refusal of President Joseph Kabila to clarify his long-term ambitions. But the death of a longtime opposition leader last month has only added to the confusion. Many Congolese remain convinced that Kabila aspires to a third term, currently forbidden by the constitution. Several of his influential supporters have openly advocated for a referendum that […]

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