Why Africa’s ‘Presidents for Life’ Are So Afraid to Lose Power

President Joseph Kabila during a parade to celebrate Congo's independence from Belgium, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, June 30, 2015 (AP photo by John Bompengo).
President Joseph Kabila during a parade to celebrate Congo's independence from Belgium, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, June 30, 2015 (AP photo by John Bompengo).
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Last month, more than 50 protesters were killed in two days of clashes with security forces in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The protesters had taken to the streets with a clear message: The country’s presidential election must be held as soon as possible, and President Joseph Kabila must step down on Dec. 19 when his term officially expires. Although the city’s authorities had authorized the demonstration, it was violently suppressed by the police and the republican guard. Having lost faith in their government since the rigged 2011 elections when Kabila was controversially re-elected, the […]

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