When It Comes to Soft Power, China Is Already Outpacing the U.S.

A cargo train rides on a Chinese-backed railway that cost $3.3 billion, one of Kenya’s largest infrastructure projects since independence, in Mombasa, May 30, 2017 (AP photo by Khalil Senosi).
A cargo train rides on a Chinese-backed railway that cost $3.3 billion, one of Kenya’s largest infrastructure projects since independence, in Mombasa, May 30, 2017 (AP photo by Khalil Senosi).

The coming crisis of American power that is sure to follow the November election will be unique in U.S. history. Competing with China, Russia and whatever other major rivals may emerge will be less about aircraft carriers, fighter jets, nuclear submarines and stealth bombers than ever before, and more about helping other governments meet the vital needs of their citizens. Although the United States suddenly has much less of a hard power edge than it once did, due to China’s rapid and ambitious modernization of its military, and particularly its navy, Americans should treat skeptically the calls that are bound […]

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