What Will the Massacre in Sudan Mean for Its Protest Movement?

A protester flashes the victory sign in front of burning tires and debris near the military’s headquarters, Khartoum, Sudan, June 3, 2019 (AP photo).
A protester flashes the victory sign in front of burning tires and debris near the military’s headquarters, Khartoum, Sudan, June 3, 2019 (AP photo).
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Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. On Tuesday, the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, Sudanese security forces staged their own brutal crackdown on demonstrators in the capital, Khartoum. More than 100 protesters are estimated to have been killed and many of their bodies dumped in the Nile, while paramilitary forces injured and raped hundreds more, according to a Sudanese doctor’s organization. The violence apparently began with an early-morning raid by the paramilitary Rapid Security Forces on a protest camp that has been stationed outside the military’s […]

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