What’s Driving Recent Border Tensions Between Ecuador and Peru?

Peru’s president, Pedro Kuczynski, congratulates Ecuador’s newly sworn-in president, Lenin Moreno, May 24, 2017. Tensions flared between Peru and Ecuador’s previous administration over a wall being built near their border (AP photo by Dolores Ochoa).
Peru’s president, Pedro Kuczynski, congratulates Ecuador’s newly sworn-in president, Lenin Moreno, May 24, 2017. Tensions flared between Peru and Ecuador’s previous administration over a wall being built near their border (AP photo by Dolores Ochoa).

Ecuador’s new president, Lenin Moreno, has helped blunt escalating tensions along his country’s border with Peru, holding in place a two-decade peace accord that has brought benefits to both sides. Plans to build a wall along the border have been halted, and strains appear to have been eased. In an email interview, Ambassador Marcel Fortuna Biato, a career Brazilian diplomat who was a principal adviser to the senior Brazilian negotiator during the Peru-Ecuador peace process from 1995 to 1998, explains the roots of the conflict dating back to the 19th century, how active measures to bring law and order to […]

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