Watching the Watchers: Intelligence Oversight in South America

Women hold signs that read “Argentine justice stinks” and “Justice for Nisman” during a march for justice in the case of the mysterious death of late prosecutor Alberto Nisman, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Feb. 4, 2015 (AP photo by Rodrigo Abd).
Women hold signs that read “Argentine justice stinks” and “Justice for Nisman” during a march for justice in the case of the mysterious death of late prosecutor Alberto Nisman, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Feb. 4, 2015 (AP photo by Rodrigo Abd).

Since transitioning from authoritarianism to democracy, civilian governments in Argentina, Chile, Peru and Colombia have made great strides in curtailing the autonomy of the armed forces in terms of accountability for past abuses, budgeting, promotion and operations. But in all these countries, the military and intelligence services have retained a degree of autonomy over specific missions and their operations, referred to as “reserved domains” in the Latin American democracy transition literature of the 1990s. Recent events have demonstrated how far the region still has to go in improving transparency and civilian control over the intelligence services. Argentina has been rocked […]

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