War is Boring: Military Could Mobilize to Battle Swine Flu

War is Boring: Military Could Mobilize to Battle Swine Flu

The World Health Organization on Monday raised its alert level for swine flu, edging the body closer to declaring a flu pandemic, while the death toll in Mexico, where the disease originated, neared 150. Half a dozen countries, including the United States, have identified swine flu cases, likely vectored by air travel.

Governments across the planet are bracing for a full-blown pandemic that could claim thousands of lives. Among U.S. agencies, the Pentagon could arguably play a leading role in combating the disease. Recent emphasis on humanitarian assistance and disaster relief has prepared the military for a global public health mission. But a lack of detailed directives from Washington could undermine the military's response.

The military's role in fighting a flu pandemic is roughly outlined in the U.S. government's 227-page "National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Implementation Plan," published in 2006 at the height of the bird-flu scare. The strategy called on the military to perform three major roles: distribution of medical supplies, including vaccines; flu treatment for military and civilian populations at its hundreds of medical facilities; and keeping the peace in the event of a quarantine or mass panic.

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of tens of thousands of articles.
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday.
  • Regular in-depth articles with deep dives into important issues and countries.
  • The Daily Review email, with our take on the day’s most important news, the latest WPR analysis, what’s on our radar, and more.
  • The Weekly Review email, with quick summaries of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.