Violence in Sudan Stalls Progress on a Post-Bashir Transition

Sudanese protesters wave national flags at the sit-in outside the military headquarters, in Khartoum, Sudan, May 2, 2019 (AP photo by Salih Basheer).
Sudanese protesters wave national flags at the sit-in outside the military headquarters, in Khartoum, Sudan, May 2, 2019 (AP photo by Salih Basheer).

Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. Sudan appeared to be inching closer to a transitional government this week, but renewed violence threatens to derail the talks. The military council, which currently holds power, and the opposition alliance, which is composed of protest leaders and opposition politicians, have agreed on a three-year period of transition to civilian rule. Under the terms of the agreement, the country will be run by a government that includes a sovereign council, a Cabinet and a legislative body. But the two sides remain at […]

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