The U.S. Military Confronts the Darker Side of Drone Strikes

The U.S. Military Confronts the Darker Side of Drone Strikes
Three brothers of Zemerai Ahmadi, who was one of 10 family members killed in an errant U.S. drone strike in August 2021, stand in front of a banner that reads in Dari, “Martyrs of Ahmadi family,” in Kabul, Afghanistan, Dec. 14, 2021 (AP photo by Khwaja Tawfiq Sediqi).

In August, the U.S. military announced a plan to reduce civilian casualties, embedding it as a concern at every level of preparation and operations. But the U.S. has always professed to take civilian casualties seriously, which raises the question of why it is now issuing a formal plan to do so and what changes might result from it.

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