U.S. and Cuba Face a Long Road Ahead to Normalization

Cuban President Raul Castro raises his fist and shout “Long live Fidel” during the closing of the twice-annual legislative session at the National Assembly in Havana, Cuba, Dec. 20, 2014 (AP photo by Ramon Espinosa).
Cuban President Raul Castro raises his fist and shout “Long live Fidel” during the closing of the twice-annual legislative session at the National Assembly in Havana, Cuba, Dec. 20, 2014 (AP photo by Ramon Espinosa).
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If the changes to the 53-year-old embargo on Cuba announced by U.S. President Barack Obama last month were contentious, implementing them will not be smooth either. To be sure, U.S. public opinion, even among younger Cuban-Americans, has shifted against the embargo, and private sector groups, especially agribusinesses that have lost market share in Cuba to Brazilian competitors, has become more organized and vocal in urging the president to exercise his authority to change the embargo. But there is still the shrill, organized contingent of hardline, pro-embargo Cuban Americans who continue to denounce the actions, led in Congress by two senators, […]

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