Twelve Years After Taylor’s Removal, Instability Still Plagues Liberia

People shopping in Waterside market, Monrovia, Liberia, Feb. 22, 2014 (photo by FLickr user fischerfotos licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).
People shopping in Waterside market, Monrovia, Liberia, Feb. 22, 2014 (photo by FLickr user fischerfotos licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).

While the lingering effects of the Ebola crisis have dominated coverage of Liberia for over a year, the country is quietly approaching a number of precipices. A convergence of political, religious and international factors on the horizon has the potential to destabilize Liberia, which has seen a tenuous peace since warlord-turned-President Charles Taylor resigned in August 2003, ending 14 years of civil war. A United Nations peacekeeping mission is poised to significantly draw down by June 2016; religious tensions have been stoked by a movement to declare Liberia a Christian state; and President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf reaches her term limit […]

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