Turkey’s Kurds Still Need Partners to Capitalize on Electoral Gains

Supporters of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party wave flags with pictures of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk and imprisoned Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan during a rally, Istanbul, Turkey, June 8, 2015 (AP photo by Lefteris Pitarakis).
Supporters of the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party wave flags with pictures of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk and imprisoned Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan during a rally, Istanbul, Turkey, June 8, 2015 (AP photo by Lefteris Pitarakis).
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They had predicted success with breezy self-confidence, but even the leaders of the Kurdish-rooted Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) were likely surprised by their historic gains in Turkey’s parliamentary elections earlier this month. Sweeping 13 percent of the national vote, the HDP became the first majority-Kurdish party to formally enter parliament in Turkish history, pushing beyond the 10 percent election threshold that had forced Kurds to field independent candidates in elections past. For HDP voters, victory seemed all the sweeter given the blow it delivered to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) failed to secure a […]

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