Tunisia’s Democratic Reforms Overshadowed by the Threat of Returning Jihadis

People demonstrate outside the Tunisian parliament with a banner reading "No to Terrorism," Tunis, Dec. 24, 2016 (AP photo by Ons Abid).
People demonstrate outside the Tunisian parliament with a banner reading "No to Terrorism," Tunis, Dec. 24, 2016 (AP photo by Ons Abid).
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Within the span of a week, Tunisia’s government was lauded abroad for passing a comprehensive anti-corruption law and lambasted at home for its muddled response to the growing number of its nationals returning from fighting among the ranks of the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. It should come as no surprise that Tunisia made headlines, on one hand, for progress on democratic reform and, on the other, for lackluster security policies. Relative to its neighbors, the country emerged relatively unscathed by the popular uprising that ousted former dictator Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali in 2011, and it has been […]

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