Trouble Brews in Bulgaria After Botched Referendum and Judicial Reform

Bulgarian Prime Minister Boyko Borisov meeting Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, Beijing, China, Nov. 26, 2015 (AP/Pool photo by Kim Kyung-hoon).
Bulgarian Prime Minister Boyko Borisov meeting Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, Beijing, China, Nov. 26, 2015 (AP/Pool photo by Kim Kyung-hoon).

Twenty-five years after the fall of communism and almost 10 years after gaining membership in the European Union, Bulgaria is plagued by widespread corruption, misappropriation of public funds and vote-rigging in nearly every election. Many Bulgarians say their country’s democracy is in shambles. The past several years were marked by widespread protests and a banking crisis that forced former Socialist Party Prime Minister Plamen Oresharski to resign in 2014 after little more than a year in office. Bulgaria, the EU’s poorest country, is now on its fifth government since 2013. But despite changes in leadership, voters continue to express their […]

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