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Supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi protest after the Muslim Brotherhood called on its supporters to take to the streets on the anniversary of the 2011 uprising, Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 25, 2016 (AP photo by Hesham Elkhoshny).

To Survive Sissi, Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood Will Need to Reinvent Itself

Friday, Feb. 23, 2018

In this week’s Trend Lines podcast, WPR’s editor-in-chief, Judah Grunstein, managing editor, Frederick Deknatel, and associate editor, Omar H. Rahman, discuss the recent indictment of 13 Russians and three Russian entities for meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Was Russia’s interference a sophisticated campaign of hybrid warfare, or a ham-handed attempt at undermining America? For the Report, Peter Dörrie talks with our contributor in Cairo about the Muslim Brotherhood’s struggle for survival under Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi.

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Relevant Articles on WPR:

Why Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood Needs to Transform to Survive
What Finland Can Teach the West About Countering Russia’s Hybrid Threats
After Zuma, a New Start for South Africa Will Be Easier Said Than Done
Turkey Moves to Expand Its Defense Industry, So Allies Cannot Tie Its Hands

Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie.

To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.