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People gather at the Oceti Sakowin camp to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline, Cannon Ball, North Dakota, Dec. 4, 2016 (AP photo by David Goldman).

U.S. Native Communities See Their Influence Grow on Local and National Stage

Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017

Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series on the legal status and socio-economic conditions of indigenous peoples in a range of countries.

Although the United States Army Corps of Engineers has temporarily stopped work on the Dakota Access Pipeline that was planned to go through the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, hundreds of protesters are still at the camp in North Dakota preparing for the next phase in the fight over the pipeline. In an email interview, Ron Whitener, the executive director of the Native American Law Center at the University of Washington, discusses Native American rights in the United States. ...

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