The UAE Deal May Be a Bittersweet Win for Israel’s Netanyahu

Tel Aviv City Hall is lit up with the flag of the United Arab Emirates after the UAE and Israel announced they would be establishing full diplomatic ties, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Aug. 13, 2020 (AP photo by Oded Balilty).
Tel Aviv City Hall is lit up with the flag of the United Arab Emirates after the UAE and Israel announced they would be establishing full diplomatic ties, in Tel Aviv, Israel, Aug. 13, 2020 (AP photo by Oded Balilty).

The landmark agreement between Israel and the United Arab Emirates that was announced unexpectedly last week, a prelude to normalized diplomatic relations, is by any measure a triumph for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. But in the tumultuous, fractious landscape of Israeli politics, Netanyahu’s celebrations have been tempered by bitter recriminations at home, a reminder that in Israel, no win comes without wounds. In the deal, first made public by U.S. President Donald Trump, the United Arab Emirates agreed to establish full diplomatic ties with Israel in exchange for Israel’s suspension of plans to annex parts of the West Bank. The […]

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