The Toughest Job in Global Health? What to Expect From the New Leader of the WHO

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the new director-general of the World Health Organization, during the 70th World Health Assembly, Geneva, Switzerland, May 23, 2017 (Keystone photo by Valentin Flauraud via AP).
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the new director-general of the World Health Organization, during the 70th World Health Assembly, Geneva, Switzerland, May 23, 2017 (Keystone photo by Valentin Flauraud via AP).

Last month, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus won the election to serve a five-year term as the director-general of the World Health Organization, beginning July 1. He may have one of the most unenviable jobs in the world. The World Health Organization does not enjoy the most stellar reputation these days, with its legitimacy and authority up for debate. Its response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa between 2014 and 2016 was widely and roundly criticized; no less than six high-level panels recommended substantial changes to how the WHO responds to crises and finances its operations. Member states have refused to […]

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