Syria’s ‘Cold’ Civil War Could Easily Get Hot Again

Syria’s ‘Cold’ Civil War Could Easily Get Hot Again
Turkish soldiers fire a missile at a Syrian government-held position in the province of Idlib, Syria, Feb. 14, 2020 (AP photo by Ghaith Alsayed).

Back in June 2011, when news began to filter out from Syria of the first signs of armed resistance against the Baathist regime of President Bashar al-Assad, few could have predicted the level of disruption to the global order that the conflict in Syria would go on to produce. After months of brutal violence against protesters inflicted by the Assad regime, local inhabitants around the town of Jisr al-Shughour in the northern province of Idlib seized a police station on June 4, triggering a major shift whose implications few observers fully understood. Two days later, armed resistance led by police […]

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