The Strange New Politics of U.S. Domestic Surveillance

Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, National Intelligence Director Dan Coats, and NSA Director Adm. Michael Rogers at a Senate hearing in Washington, June 7, 2017 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, National Intelligence Director Dan Coats, and NSA Director Adm. Michael Rogers at a Senate hearing in Washington, June 7, 2017 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).

Over the past year, new threats to peace and security have emerged so quickly it is difficult to keep up. The COVID-19 crisis, now well into its second year, will surely continue to rage for some time, and climate change is likely to fuel widespread upheaval in the future. Extremism and polarization, fueled by social media, permit the ancient hatreds of fanaticism, misogyny and racism to inspire terrorism, mass shootings and mob violence. Ever-more sensitive data is being hacked at alarming rates, with rival powers unable or unwilling to agree on enforceable norms to avoid cyber conflict and improve cybersecurity. […]

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