How Ramaphosa’s Failures Left South Africa Vulnerable to a Pandemic

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa at the NASREC Expo Center in Johannesburg, April 24, 2020 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
South African President Cyril Ramaphosa at the NASREC Expo Center in Johannesburg, April 24, 2020 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
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When Cyril Ramaphosa became president of South Africa in February 2018, many South Africans saw it as a “new dawn” for their country. In the aftermath of Jacob Zuma’s corruption-plagued presidency, Ramaphosa seemed to offer the hope of competent leadership and accountable government. Commentators spoke of “Ramaphoria,” as the new president sought to revive the spirit of idealism that informed the early days of post-apartheid South Africa in the 1990s, and to engineer a definitive break with what he acknowledged were “nine wasted years” under Zuma. Ramaphosa promised more than just a change in the political atmospherics, however. His administration […]

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