The Future of U.S.-Jordan Relations and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Under Biden

Jordan’s King Abdullah II, right, meets with then-Vice President Joe Biden at the Husseiniya Palace in Amman, Jordan, March 10, 2016 (AP photo by Raad Adayleh).
Jordan’s King Abdullah II, right, meets with then-Vice President Joe Biden at the Husseiniya Palace in Amman, Jordan, March 10, 2016 (AP photo by Raad Adayleh).
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Few governments were as relieved as Jordan’s at the results of last month’s presidential election in the United States. King Abdullah II was one of the first world leaders to congratulate Joe Biden for his victory over Donald Trump, and Biden spoke with Abdullah by phone last week, his first call with an Arab leader since winning office. Despite a long history of cooperation on economic and security issues, U.S. ties with Jordan were strained under Trump’s presidency, largely due to Trump’s lopsided approach to the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Under Biden, the relationship is likely to “go back to what […]

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