It’s Time to Rethink How We Judge Rich Countries’ Performance

It’s Time to Rethink How We Judge Rich Countries’ Performance
A student takes notes inside a classroom at a school in Harare, Zimbabwe, Sept. 28, 2020 (AP file photo by Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi).

The topic of my column last week, the first in an occasional series of a Q&As with interesting thinkers, was ostensibly the rapidly changing nature of cities in Africa. But an important subtext of the piece, present throughout the conversation, was African performance or, perhaps better stated, underperformance on a range of issues. My interlocutor last week, George Kankou Denkey, noted, for example, that Africa, a continent that is presently urbanizing on a scale never experienced anywhere before, generally lacks urban planners; even its universities seem unengaged with the topic. Elsewhere, he pointed out that although one of the largest megalopolises […]

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