The Changing Landscape for International Peacekeeping

Peacekeepers clear the area in the aftermath of a terror attack that killed six peacekeepers, Kidal, Mali, Feb. 12, 2016 (U.N. photo by Marco Dormino).
Peacekeepers clear the area in the aftermath of a terror attack that killed six peacekeepers, Kidal, Mali, Feb. 12, 2016 (U.N. photo by Marco Dormino).

In this week’s Trend Lines Podcast, Richard Gowan, a fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations and WPR columnist, joins host Peter Dörrie to discuss the changing nature of peacekeeping, including the rise of regional peacekeepers, the role of the United Nations and the politics behind peacekeeping. Listen:Download: MP3Subscribe: iTunes | RSS Relevant articles on WPR: Less Talk, More Action for International Peacekeepers in 2016? ‘Carnivores’ Battle ‘Herbivores’ for Future of U.N.’s Peacemaking Soul Technical Fixes Not Enough to Shore Up U.N. Peacekeeping CAR Scandal Reflects U.N. Peacekeeping’s Loss of Strategic Direction Richard Gowan is an associate fellow at […]

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