The Challenge of Feeding Arab Gulf Countries in a Post-Fossil Fuel World

An Emirati man eats his lunch, a chicken Majboos, also known as Kabsa, at the Emirates Guest Cook restaurant in Shahama, United Arab Emirates, Dec. 23, 2014 (AP photo by Kamran Jebreili).
An Emirati man eats his lunch, a chicken Majboos, also known as Kabsa, at the Emirates Guest Cook restaurant in Shahama, United Arab Emirates, Dec. 23, 2014 (AP photo by Kamran Jebreili).

Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing series on food security around the world. Ensuring an adequate and balanced food supply has never been easy for Gulf Arab nations, which are both extremely water-scarce and reliant on food imports. The situation will only get more difficult in the coming decades, as climate change threatens global agricultural production and energy demand shifts away from fossil fuels—the Gulf region’s primary export. In an interview with WPR, Eckart Woertz, a senior research fellow at the Barcelona Center for International Affairs and author of “Oil for Food: The Global Food Crisis and […]

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