The Cease-Fire in the Republic of Congo Is the Latest Sign of Sassou Nguesso’s Weakness

Congolese President Denis Sassou Nguesso is greeted by Mohamed Larbi Ould Khelifa, president of the lower house of Algeria’s parliament, Algiers, March 27, 2017 (Sipa photo by Billal Bensalem via AP).
Congolese President Denis Sassou Nguesso is greeted by Mohamed Larbi Ould Khelifa, president of the lower house of Algeria’s parliament, Algiers, March 27, 2017 (Sipa photo by Billal Bensalem via AP).
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For well over a year, information coming out of the Republic of Congo’s southeastern Pool region, though limited, has pointed to a brutal armed conflict with grave humanitarian consequences. In its crackdown on the Ntsiloulou rebel group, also known as the “Ninjas,” the government of President Denis Sassou Nguesso has been accused of carrying out torture, mass evictions, arbitrary arrests and even aerial bombardments against civilians. Grisly violence has also been attributed to the rebels, including attacks on rail lines connecting the region to the rest of the country. The conflict in Pool started immediately after Sassou Nguesso was named […]

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