The Arrest of Prominent Liberians Abroad Is Stirring Talk of Justice at Home

Men watch the announcement of a ruling on an appeal bid by former Liberian President Charles Taylor, Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 26, 2013 (AP photo by Mark Darrough).
Men watch the announcement of a ruling on an appeal bid by former Liberian President Charles Taylor, Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 26, 2013 (AP photo by Mark Darrough).
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On June 2, authorities in the U.K. charged Agnes Reeves Taylor, the ex-wife of former Liberian President Charles Taylor, with torture in connection with crimes she allegedly committed during the West African nation’s prolonged period of civil conflict. The arrest makes Reeves Taylor the latest in a series of high-profile Liberians to be arrested in Europe and the United States in recent years. In Liberia, meanwhile, there has been no progress on justice initiatives under President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. Charles Taylor is serving a 50-year sentence in the U.K. for war crimes and crimes against humanity, but his trial dealt […]

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