Taking Stock of the RCEP’s Prospects as China and Japan Get on a ‘Normal Track’

Toshihiro Nikai, left, secretary general of the Liberal Democratic Party of Japan, greets Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi during their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Aug. 31, 2018 (AP photo by Roman Pilipey).
Toshihiro Nikai, left, secretary general of the Liberal Democratic Party of Japan, greets Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi during their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Aug. 31, 2018 (AP photo by Roman Pilipey).

Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, WPR’s newsletter and engagement editor, Benjamin Wilhelm, curates the top news and analysis from China written by the experts who follow it. Signs of improved ties between China and Japan have rekindled hopes of swift progress toward establishing the China-backed Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, or RCEP, which would be the world’s largest free trade deal if it ever comes to fruition. China initially unveiled the agreement as a rival to the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from after taking office. Japan led the efforts to salvage and revise the TPP without the […]

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