Syriza’s Rise Will Test Greece and EU, but the Euro Is Safe

The flags of Greece and the European Union billow in the wind in front of the ruins of the fifth century B.C. Parthenon temple, Athens, Greece, Jan. 23, 2015 (AP photo by Petros Giannakouris).
The flags of Greece and the European Union billow in the wind in front of the ruins of the fifth century B.C. Parthenon temple, Athens, Greece, Jan. 23, 2015 (AP photo by Petros Giannakouris).

This Sunday, Jan. 25, Greeks will go to the polls for snap elections, with the radical left party Syriza currently polling ahead of the governing center-right New Democracy party by a margin of about 5 percent. The elections were called due to a technicality of Greece’s constitution requiring the dissolution of parliament if it is unable to elect a new president, a mostly decorative post in Greece’s parliamentary democracy. When that in fact transpired and parliament was dissolved on Dec. 29, three things became apparent about the course of the country’s politics and fragile economic recovery, even as new questions […]

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