Strategic ‘Withdrawal’ Leaves EU Dependent on Others to Solve Its Problems

French and Iranian energy officials at a bilateral agreements session, Paris, Jan. 28, 2016 (AP photo by Stephane de Sakutin).
French and Iranian energy officials at a bilateral agreements session, Paris, Jan. 28, 2016 (AP photo by Stephane de Sakutin).

Would anyone like to save Europe from itself? The continent is presently enduring economic weakness, an influx of refugees, rising nationalism and a general sense of insecurity. All too often, its leaders’ collective response to these multiple threats is not to take decisive action but to look around for someone else to do so, echoing the motto of Charles Dickens’ eternal optimist, Mr. Micawber: “Something will turn up.” The range of “somethings” that might dig Europe out of its strategic hole is broad. Russia could become more moderate, easing security fears. Turkey and African states might adopt robust policies to […]

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