South Africa’s Zuma Faces Double Bind on Troubled Economy

South Africa’s Zuma Faces Double Bind on Troubled Economy
South African President Jacob Zuma at an auditorium at Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, Dec. 5, 2014 (AP photo by Ng Han Guan).

The past two years have been deeply unsettling ones for South Africa’s economy, defined by sluggish growth rates, power shortages, service delivery protests and endemic labor unrest. International ratings agencies are getting wary and could eventually downgrade the country’s sovereign credit rating. President Jacob Zuma’s government is currently failing to satisfy any of the key constituencies with a material stake in its economic policy: its own support base, an increasingly fragmented labor movement and investors at home and abroad. Like other emerging markets around the world, including the once-solid BRICS, South Africa’s economy is in a sea of trouble. Since […]

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