Serbia’s Failure to Reckon With Its Past Weighs Heavily on Its Future

A man wrapped in a flag adorned with a photo of former Bosnian Serb military leader Ratko Mladic prays in a church as part of ceremonies to celebrate a banned Serb holiday, Banja Luka, Bosnia, Jan. 9, 2018 (AP photo by Radivoje Pavicic).
A man wrapped in a flag adorned with a photo of former Bosnian Serb military leader Ratko Mladic prays in a church as part of ceremonies to celebrate a banned Serb holiday, Banja Luka, Bosnia, Jan. 9, 2018 (AP photo by Radivoje Pavicic).

In this week’s Trend Lines podcast, WPR’s editor-in-chief, Judah Grunstein, managing editor, Frederick Deknatel, and associate editor, Omar H. Rahman, discuss the week’s biggest news, including Turkey’s invasion of northern Syria and European leaders’ newfound confidence in pushing back against U.S. President Donald Trump. For the Report, Valerie Hopkins talks with Peter Dörrie about Serbia’s failure to come to grips with its role in the wars that accompanied the breakup of the former Yugoslavia, and the divisive legacy of those conflicts—both in Serbia and the wider region—almost 20 years after they ended. If you like what you hear on Trend […]

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