Romania’s Protests Revealed Both Democratic Strength and Institutional Weakness

Tens of thousands of people shine lights from mobile phones and torches during a protest in front of the government building, Bucharest, Romania, Feb. 5, 2017 (AP photo by Andreea Alexandru).
Tens of thousands of people shine lights from mobile phones and torches during a protest in front of the government building, Bucharest, Romania, Feb. 5, 2017 (AP photo by Andreea Alexandru).

Romania’s biggest protests since the fall of communism in 1989 have been widely hailed as a victory for people power and civic activism against a corrupt elite. The weeks-long mass demonstrations, which led to Prime Minister Sorin Grindeanu’s new government backing down on controversial plans to weaken anti-corruption laws, energized those previously unengaged with politics. But long-term questions remain about democracy in Romania, where street protests have become increasingly frequent as Romanians lose faith in their political parties. Protests began in January against plans by the government, which is led by the left-leaning Social Democratic Party, or PSD, to effectively […]

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