Report of Police Death Squad Adds to Public Security Anxieties in Peru

Police near Peru's Congress during President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski's inauguration ceremony, Lima, July 28, 2016 (AP photo by Rodrigo Abd).
Police near Peru's Congress during President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski's inauguration ceremony, Lima, July 28, 2016 (AP photo by Rodrigo Abd).
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In the most serious accusation among many that have damaged the reputation of Peru’s National Police in recent years, the country’s Interior Ministry has identified a group of police officers who allegedly participated in “death squads” that assassinated petty criminals in order to earn extra money or promotions, at a time when crime was rising to unprecedented levels. The charges complicate the urgent challenge of improving public security for a new government that has been in power for less than a month. According to the national press, 97 police officers are under investigation for the extrajudicial killings of 27 criminals […]

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