Recent Arrests Don’t Change Israel’s Soft Approach to Tackling Settler Violence

A Palestinian boy in front of an Israeli housing development, East Jerusalem, Sept. 21, 2009 (AP photo by Bernat Armangue).
A Palestinian boy in front of an Israeli housing development, East Jerusalem, Sept. 21, 2009 (AP photo by Bernat Armangue).

Last week, the Israeli national security agency Shin Bet announced a series of arrests of extremist Israeli settlers suspected in the July arson attack that killed a Palestinian family of three in the West Bank village of Duma. The grisly incident, in which radicals from illegal Israeli settlements set a home on fire, leaving an 18-month-old boy to burn to death, brought settler violence to the fore. Although the Duma attack renewed concerns over settlement expansion and the violence it brings, such episodes are not new. As far back as 2008, settlers coined the term “price tag” to describe acts […]

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