Quarantined: How Ebola Derailed Sierra Leone’s Postwar Recovery

A man travels along a street in his wheelchair during a three-day lockdown to prevent the spread on the Ebola virus, Freetown, Sierra Leone, Sept. 21, 2014 (AP photo by Michael Duff).
A man travels along a street in his wheelchair during a three-day lockdown to prevent the spread on the Ebola virus, Freetown, Sierra Leone, Sept. 21, 2014 (AP photo by Michael Duff).
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“Di war don don,” declared Sierra Leonean President Ahmad Kabbah, in Krio, at a ceremony in the capital, Freetown, in 2002: “The war is over.” The small coastal West African country of Sierra Leone had emerged limping and gasping for air from a decade of one of the bloodiest civil wars in Africa, a conflict that had spilled out across the entire region from Guinea to the north and west to Liberia and Cote d’Ivoire to the east. It was a war over power and the toppling of a corrupt regime, but it became infamous for its “blood diamonds” and […]

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