Power and the Presidency: Jokowi’s Rocky First Year in Indonesia

Indonesian President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo delivers his speech before Parliament members ahead of the country's Independence Day, Jakarta, Indonesia, Aug. 14, 2015 (AP photo by Tatan Syuflana).
Indonesian President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo delivers his speech before Parliament members ahead of the country's Independence Day, Jakarta, Indonesia, Aug. 14, 2015 (AP photo by Tatan Syuflana).
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On Oct. 20, 2014, Joko Widodo, popularly referred to as Jokowi, was sworn in as Indonesia’s new president—a champion of the people and pin-up for clean, open and efficient governance. What a difference a year can make. Over his first year in office, the limits to Jokowi’s power, political agenda and capacity to manage complex relationships have been repeatedly exposed. Powerful political oligarchs, an entrenched and entitled bureaucracy, an army eager to reinvigorate its relevance and a corruption-riddled justice sector—to name a few—were always going to present significant challenges to Jokowi’s presidency, and they didn’t delay. One of the most […]

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