go to top
President Donald Trump delivers opening remarks at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. World Economic Forum founder and Executive Chairman Klaus Schwab listens as President Donald Trump delivers opening remarks at the World Economic Forum, in Davos, Switzerland, Jan. 21, 2020 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).

Can Davos Solve the Problems That It Helped Create?

Friday, Jan. 24, 2020

In this week’s editors’ discussion on Trend Lines, WPR’s Judah Grunstein and Freddy Deknatel talk about the recent evolution of the World Economic Forum, which was held this week in Davos, Switzerland. In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, the elite crowd at Davos has tried to critically engage with the negative consequences of globalization, particularly the brand of globalization it has championed. That reflects the degree to which income and wealth inequality, the climate crisis and the downsides of new technologies have become central topics in political debates around the world. But how much of the newfound social consciousness at Davos is sincere, and how much is virtue-signaling?

If you like what you hear on Trend Lines and what you’ve read on WPR, you can sign up for our free newsletter to get our uncompromising analysis delivered straight to your inbox. The newsletter offers a free preview article every day of the week, plus three more complimentary articles in our weekly roundup every Friday. Sign up here. Then subscribe.

Listen:

Download: MP3
Subscribe: iTunes | RSS | Spotify

Relevant Articles on WPR:
Greta Thunberg Is Right About the Climate Crisis. Now What?
The Bezos Hack and the Dangers of Spyware in the Hands of Autocrats
Donald Versus Davos: Whose World Is It?
Trump Found the Sweet Spot Where ‘America First’ and the Davos World Meet
The Sorry State of U.S. Election Security Makes Foreign Interference Inevitable
Zimbabwe’s Old Guard, Still in Power After Mugabe, Is Stifling Its Youth

Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie.

To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.