go to top
A man watches a TV showing an image of a North Korean missile launch. A man watches a TV showing an image of a North Korean missile launch during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Aug. 6, 2019 (AP photo by Ahn Young-joon).

North Korea’s Provocations and the Future of Algeria’s Protest Movement

Friday, Aug. 9, 2019

In this week’s editors’ discussion on Trend Lines, WPR’s managing editor, Frederick Deknatel, and associate editor, Elliot Waldman, talk about North Korea’s recent string of short-range ballistic missile tests, the Trump administration’s less-than-forceful response, and what that says about the broader dysfunction plaguing the U.S. intelligence and foreign policy communities. They also discuss the ongoing pro-democracy protests in Algeria, which are now in their 25th week. As Francisco Serrano notes in his in-depth report for WPR this week, the outlook for the country’s protest movement remains unclear, given the risks that Algeria’s military leaders could still revert to form and crack down on the demonstrators.

If you like what you hear on Trend Lines and what you’ve read on WPR, you can sign up for our free newsletter to get our uncompromising analysis delivered straight to your inbox. The newsletter offers a free preview article every day of the week, plus three more complimentary articles in our weekly roundup every Friday. Sign up here. Then subscribe.

Listen:

Download: MP3
Subscribe: iTunes | RSS | Spotify

Relevant Articles on WPR:
South Korea and Japan Are Embroiled in a Trade War. Can the U.S. Step In?
Egged on by Trump, America’s Friends Are Fighting and Undermining the U.S.
After Bouteflika’s Ouster, Algeria’s Popular Uprising Faces a Much Bigger Test
Kelly Knight Craft’s Long To-Do List at the United Nations
For Justice in Myanmar, Sanction the War Profiteers Financing Genocide

Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie.

To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.