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Paramilitary fighters from the “Banana Bloc” arrive at a rural area outside the northwestern Colombian town of Turbo to turn in their arms, Nov. 21, 2004 (Photo by Julio Cesar Herrerea for El Tiempo via AP Images).

In Postwar Colombia, Land Restitution Remains an Empty Promise

Friday, Feb. 8, 2019

In this week’s Trend Lines podcast, WPR’s editor-in-chief, Judah Grunstein, and managing editor, Frederick Deknatel, discuss the implications of the upcoming second summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, and the potential consequences of a content-free diplomatic process. For the Report, Mariana Palau talks with WPR’s senior editor, Robbie Corey-Boulet, about Colombia’s post-conflict land restitution program, which is not only struggling in its mission to help landowners reclaim property that was stolen during the country’s civil war, but is also in some cases driving a new cycle of displacement.

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Relevant Articles on WPR:
‘Land Was a War Booty’: Colombia Confronts a Legacy of Mass Displacement
Can the U.S. and South Korea Stay Aligned on North Korea Sanctions?
Guyana’s Pending Oil Boom—or Bust
Renewed Conflict in Western Myanmar Could Add to the Rohingya’s Woes

Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie.

To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.