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A coca farmer shows off his crop, Chapare region, Bolivia, Feb. 11, 2018 (photo by Max Radwin).

Is Bolivia’s Coca Policy a Solution to Drug Trafficking—or Part of the Problem?

Friday, June 8, 2018

In this week’s Trend Lines podcast, WPR’s editor-in-chief, Judah Grunstein, and managing editor, Frederick Deknatel, discuss the tense Group of Seven leaders’ summit and the implications of President Donald Trump’s protectionist trade policies on relations with America’s closest allies. For the Report, Max Radwin talks with WPR’s senior editor, Robbie Corey-Boulet, about Bolivia’s coca policy under President Evo Morales, which is meant to protect indigenous traditions but is accused by some critics of fueling the cocaine trade.

If you like what you hear on Trend Lines and what you’ve read on WPR, you can sign up for our free newsletter to get our uncompromising analysis delivered straight to your inbox. The newsletter offers a free preview article every day of the week, plus three more complimentary articles in our weekly roundup every Friday. Sign up here. Then subscribe.

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Relevant Articles on WPR:

Is Bolivia’s Coca Policy Protecting Traditions, or Creating a Narco-State?
‘Who Isn’t Involved?’: How Corruption Fuels Cocaine Trafficking in Bolivia
How South Koreans Are Coping With the Chaos of Trump’s High-Risk Diplomacy
Spain’s New Socialist Government Couldn’t Have Come at a Better Time for the EU

Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie.

To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.