One Year On, Feeding Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh Requires a Herculean Effort

A Rohingya refugee boy who is among those being relocated from a camp near the Bangladesh Myanmar border waits to receive a food card, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Jan. 21, 2018 (AP photo by Manish Swarup).
A Rohingya refugee boy who is among those being relocated from a camp near the Bangladesh Myanmar border waits to receive a food card, Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, Jan. 21, 2018 (AP photo by Manish Swarup).

Editor’s note: This article is the first in a new series on food security around the world. One year has passed since the most recent wave of Rohingya refugees streamed into Bangladesh, fleeing a brutal and indiscriminate security crackdown in their home state of Rakhine, in western Myanmar. On Monday, a United Nations commission recommended the investigation and prosecution of senior leaders in Myanmar’s security forces for “the gravest crimes under international law.” Almost 900,000 Rohingya refugees now reside in a network of camps in southern Bangladesh, largely reliant on external assistance for their basic daily needs. Food insecurity is […]

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