No End in Sight to Venezuela’s Unrest as Maduro Tightens His Grip on Power

Amid a cloud of tear gas during clashes with security forces, an anti-government protester covers himself with a shield that reads "Freedom" in Spanish, Caracas, Venezuela, May 10, 2017 (AP photo by Ariana Cubillos).
Amid a cloud of tear gas during clashes with security forces, an anti-government protester covers himself with a shield that reads "Freedom" in Spanish, Caracas, Venezuela, May 10, 2017 (AP photo by Ariana Cubillos).
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Since the beginning of April, Venezuela has witnessed sustained protests on a scale not seen since 2014, when 43 people died during anti-government unrest. The latest wave of protests, in which at least 42 people have died, was initially triggered by the Supreme Court’s attempts earlier this year to assume the powers of the opposition-dominated National Assembly. Although the move was revoked days after it was introduced, it served as a catalyst for protests over wider grievances, including shortages of basic goods, triple-figure inflation and increasingly undemocratic practices by the ruling United Socialist Party of Venezuela, or PSUV. Government attempts […]

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