New EU Border Mission Reflects Old Divisions on Migration

Italian Interior Minister Angelino Alfano and Defense Minister Roberta Pinotti present the EU ‘Triton’ border mission, Rome, Italy, Oct. 31, 2014 (AP photo by Gregorio Borgia).
Italian Interior Minister Angelino Alfano and Defense Minister Roberta Pinotti present the EU ‘Triton’ border mission, Rome, Italy, Oct. 31, 2014 (AP photo by Gregorio Borgia).

On Saturday, the European Union’s border agency Frontex launched a border control mission in the Mediterranean Sea known as Triton. The operation comes days after Italy ended its search-and-rescue mission, Mare Nostrum, which rescued over 150,000 migrants over the past year. Italy will still maintain a Mediterranean presence during a two-month transition period, but Mare Nostrum’s $12 million monthly price tag, together with pressure from other EU member states that claim the mission gave migrants easy entrance into Europe, have caused Italy to end the operation. As I wrote earlier this year, Italy has borne the brunt of European migration. […]

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