New Education Reforms Stumble Because of Old Problems in Ghana

New Education Reforms Stumble Because of Old Problems in Ghana
A group of school children look at a solar eclipse in Accra, Ghana, March 29, 2006 (AP photo Olivier Asselin).

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an ongoing series about education policy in various countries around the world.

In September, Ghana’s government implemented two significant education reform policies, making secondary education free and requiring new licensing requirements for teachers. Despite the progressive steps, previous attempts at education reform have not always achieved the desired results, and the latest one is already showing similar signs of struggle. In an email interview, Veronica Dzeagu, the national coordinator for the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition, a network of civil society groups and educational research institutions, discusses the state of the country’s education system, the challenges of reform and the expectations of Ghanaians.

WPR: What prompted these education reforms, what challenges were they intended to overcome, and how much impact do you anticipate they will have?

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