Neglected Risk of Russia’s Syria Intervention: Military Accidents

Neglected Risk of Russia’s Syria Intervention: Military Accidents
A Russian war plane at Hemeimeem airbase, Syria, Oct. 22, 2015 (AP photo by Vladimir Isachenkov).

As Russian warplanes continue to attack targets in Syria, the apparent decisiveness of Moscow’s actions, at least in the view of some observers, has obscured an important reality: the poor readiness of Russia’s accident-prone military, which could increase the risk of an error with significant political or military consequences. The United States and Russia have been engaged in so-called deconfliction talks to prevent accidental contact or clashes between American and Russian jets in the skies above Syria. But as a reportedly errant cruise missile strike in the early days of Russia’s intervention showed, along with Russian planes consistently breaching Turkish […]

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